My kids and I started the school holidays with a Terrarium Workshop organized by my son’s school PSG (parent support group).

Prior to this workshop, I had no idea what a terrarium is.  Now, I am absolutely hooked on it.

Born without a green thumb – that is to say, green plants die on me quite easily, I was a bit sceptical about creating a garden, even if it was in a bottle. However, terrariums are quite easy to create. AND they are quite low maintenance. You do not need to water them or nurture them. It’s like having your own miniature greenhouse in beautiful glass containers without all the work and hassle. They look so pretty on the table top.

What I enjoyed most about this workshop were the metaphors the speaker attached to the ingredients to emphasize the importance of family unity and the clear demonstrations of creating the terrarium. In fact, the instructions were so easy to follow that the kids could create not one but two terrariums on their own.

1) Ready, Set, Go

Love In A Bottle Workshop

All the ingredients are laid out on the table and ready for the kids to create their garden in a bottle. Here are the ingredients you need to create terrariums.

  • Glass container – you can get some from Daiso ($2).
  • Rocks (polished pebbles, sea glass, marbles, etc.)
  • Sphagnum or sheet moss
  • Soil
  • Plants that won’t overgrow (good choices include boxwood, croton, Joseph’s coat, pineapple verbena and twiggy spikemoss for sun-loving plants and gnome ivy, golden club moss, Irish or Scottish club moss and miniature ferns for shade-loving plants.)
  • Basic tools (spoons or a funnel for placing soil, long tweezers for putting materials into the vessel, scissors for clipping greenery, and paper towels,cotton swabs or ink brush for cleaning the glass.)

2) Layering The Terrarium

The siblings working hand-in-hand to create the terrarium. First layer is the pebble (father) that forms the foundation of the terrarium.

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Next, we added in the nurturing soil (mother) to grow the plants in. US.Terranium (14)

3) Planting and decorating the terrarium

Then, we carefully uproot the plants of our choice, clean it of existing soil and replant them in our terrarium jar. The plants symbolizes the members of our family. We had 4 plants in each jar; each with a different characteristic.

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Finally, we place the final touches by decorating our little garden with colorful pebbles.

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Big brother was helpful in closing up the air-holes in the soil by gently pounding it with the ink-brush. Little sister watched and waited patiently for her turn to add in the colorful beads.

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I was very happy to let the brother and sister team lead this workshop and see the cooperation between this pair of siblings. Turns out, I didn’t have to lift a finger at all.

A word of caution: do warn your kids that the glass jars are fragile and instruct them to handle it properly. One kid at our workshop held his glass jar by the cap and dropped his entire terrarium jar – a real unfortunate accident.

You can use a plastic container, but terrariums work and look better in a glass one.Check out these cool glass container ideas you can use for your terrariums.

Bonding over terrarium

 

And Voila! The finished terrarium sits prettily on my table counter. 

Terrarium

Need new ideas for your next bonding event or birthday party? Why not have a terrarium party? Your guests will love to take home these wonderful party goodies!

Check out this simple pictorial instruction on how to build terrariums by Better Homes and Gardens. You can find the ingredients at most nurseries in bulk or if you just want to build a personal one, check out the DIY set as well as different gift sets by Hedge Garden.

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3 Comments

  1. hi meiling,

    saw your article on d terrarium diy garden..
    v interesting..

    kindly contact me on my email as jus bought in a new range ..planting without soil…can b all ages..

    thx ..
    helen

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